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Degenerative Disc Disease

March 21st, 2019

Degenerative Disc Disease

Overview and causes

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is the term used to describe the normal changes in the spinal discs as the body ages. Vertebrae, which make up the spine, are separated by the soft disks. These discs act as shock absorbers. This condition occurs when one of these disks weakens.

Despite the name, it is not actually a disease. But that does not mean the pain it causes is less real. It can be very painful and can affect quality of life to a great extent. Disc degeneration is a normal part of aging, but for some individuals, it can cause severe and chronic pain.

Following are some of the causes of degenerative disc disease:

  • The loss of fluid in the discs can be a cause. This makes the disk less flexible and reduces its ability to absorb shocks. This also reduces the distance between the vertebrae.

  • Annulus or capsule (the outer layer of disc) may be damaged or cracked. As a result the nucleus (jelly-like material inside the disc) may be forced to flow out of the cracks or tears. This may cause the disc to rupture, break into fragments or bulge.

  • A sudden injury to the disc can start disc degeneration

  • Smoking, heavy physical work and obesity can also cause degeneration.

Symptoms and diagnosis

Symptoms of degenerative disc disease include:

  • Pain in lower back which radiates to hips

  • Pain in thighs or buttocks while walking

  • In some cases, irregular tingling or weakness through the knees

  • Pain in upper spine which may radiate to shoulders, arms and hands

This condition is diagnosed with a physical examination and a review of medical history. During physical examination, the surgeon looks for tenderness and changes related to nerves, for example changes in reflexes, numbness or tingling. Other conditions such as tumors, fractures and infections are also checked.

If symptoms of degenerative disc disease are suspected after initial examination, imaging tests may also be performed for diagnosis. These tests may include X-rays, MRIs or CT scans. Imaging tests are usually considered if the symptoms develop after injury or damage to nerves.

Treatment

Usually this condition can be successfully treated with non-surgical treatments. One or a combination of treatments like chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT), physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications can often provide relief.

Surgical treatment may be recommended if the non-surgical treatments fail to provide relief within two to three months. It may also be recommended if pain in legs or back restricts normal activity, if it is difficult to stand or walk, or if there is numbness or weakness in legs. Surgical treatment options include Anterior Cervical Discectomy with Fusion, Intervertebral Disc Annuloplasty, Intervertebral Disc Arthroplasty, etc.

Risks and benefits

The draw back of non-surgical treatment is that it can be slow and take a long time to provide complete relief. The benefit is less disruption to the patient's routine life, as it does not require hospitalization or rehabilitation.

On the other hand, surgical treatments can be highly disruptive and they may require hospitalization and have activity restrictions for at least three to four weeks following surgery. Surgical treatment may be necessary if conservative treatments have not been successful or if the condition is too severe.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


Cilantro-Lime Pasta Salad

March 16th, 2019
Recipe: Cilantro Lime Pasta Salad

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces uncooked Farfalle (bow-tie) pasta
  • ¼ c. lime juice
  • ¼ c. fresh cilantro leaves
  • 2 tbs. olive oil
  • 1 tb. sugar
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. ground cumin
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper
  • Olive or canola oil for grill
  • 1 lb. skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 ½ c. grape tomatoes, halved
  • 1 large purple onion, finely chopped
  • 1 medium mango, seeded, peeled, cut in ½ -inch pieces
  • 1 medium avocado, seeded, peeled, cut in ½ - inch pieces
  • 1 medium yellow bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 jalapeno, seeded and finely chopped
  • Lime wedges

Directions

Cook the pasta

Cook and drain the pasta, taking care not to overcook. Hint: Change up the look by substituting Rotini or Fusilli pasta.

Whip up the dressing

In a blender combine the lime juice, cilantro, 2 tbs. of oil, sugar, salt to taste, garlic powder, cumin, and cayenne pepper. Cover and blend until well mixed (about 30 seconds).

Grill the chicken

Coat the oven rack or grill rack lightly with oil and preheat. Sprinkle the chicken lightly with salt and black pepper, and place it on the rack. If your grill has a lid, close it. Grill until the chicken is no longer pink (170 degrees F). This should take about 6 minutes on a covered grill, 12 - 15 minutes on an open grill - turn once at the halfway point. Cut the grilled chicken into bite-size pieces.

Toss and dress

In a large bowl combine the pasta, chicken, tomatoes, onion, mango, avocado, sweet peppers, and jalapeno. Pour the dressing over the pasta mixture and toss gently to coat. Serve with lime wedges.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


Packing on the Pounds Avoid These 4 Eating Mistakes

March 11th, 2019

Packing on the Pounds? Avoid These 4 Eating Mistakes

Are you trying to lose weight but failing miserably? It may not be your fault! You may think you are putting in all the hard work necessary to reach and maintain a healthy weight. But the truth is, sometimes, you should be dieting smarter, not harder!

You could be sabotaging your diet without even knowing it.

What does this mean? For example, you may think that you are just fine snacking on that healthy carrot, but undoing the benefit by adding calorie laden blue cheese dip to every bite.

Here are 4 more common examples of the ways that we can unknowingly ruin our diets.

  1. Ease up on the olive oil. It contains about 954 calories and 108 grams of fat per ½ cup.

    The solution: don’t use more than you need. When grilling or broiling food, use a tool such as a pastry brush to lightly dab the food with oil. And, don’t just splash on the salad dressing: measure out a tablespoon or two, and you’ll be able to calculate the amount of calories and fat you’re adding.
  2. Coffee can be more fattening than you realize! Regular coffee without any add-ons isn’t the problem; the dietary damage occurs when you add sugary ingredients like honey, whipped cream, syrups, and fats from whole milk, half and half or cream.

    The solution: try flavored coffee beans flavors, such as hazel nut or white chocolate, instead of using sugary additives. Apply the same advice to tea drinks.
  3. Avoiding fat like the plague. This is usually a mistake. Your body needs healthy fats, and if you try to cut out all fat, you’ll end up with cravings that could lead you back toward unhealthful eating habits. Worse, removing fats from foods almost always means replacing them with something else (usually hidden salt or sugars). Research has shown that abandoning all fat can lead to an increase in obesity, producing the opposite effect intended!

    Fat doesn’t make people fat, but sugar does.
  4. You don’t need to think in terms of 3 meals a day: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Actually, to keep your metabolism at its peak, you should eat a smaller every three to four hours. However, don’t let adding small meals increase your total food consumption.

There are many more ways we can sabotage our diets. Hopefully this short list will get you thinking more about how you could be undermining your best intentions, and overeating by accident.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


How To Destroy Your Spine – Part 3

March 6th, 2019

How to Destroy Your Spine Part 3: not exercising

So far you've leared how your lifting habits and posture can destroy your back. This article will focus on how not exercising may be hurting you more than you know. Here's how:

Not Exercising:

We all know proper nutrition and exercise are important for maintaining general health. Did you know that weight-bearing exercises can help strengthen your bones? Bone is living tissue, so it responds to exercise by becoming stronger. This is especially important if you're over 30, as that's the time many of us begin to lose bone mass.

In addition, regular exercise can help improve coordination, balance, and muscle strength. This has the added benefit of reducing the chance of falls that can result in fractures and other injuries. Weight bearing exercises are especially important for women over 30 or anyone in danger of developing osteoporosis. By working to improve bone strength, the risk of osteoporosis can be reduced. Those already diagnosed with osteoporosis should discuss the best exercise options with their doctor.

Weight-bearing exercises are the best for bone health. These are exercises that require working against gravity. This includes jogging, weight training, tennis, dancing, tai chi, yoga, and others. Starting a fitness routine that involves activities like these can help you stop hurting your spine and start helping it.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


My Back hurts: Is it strained muscles or a slipped disc?

March 1st, 2019

Back Pain? Join the Crowd!

Woman with back pain

If you’ve ever suffered back pain, you are a long way from being alone. There are estimates that at one point or another in their lives, some 80% of the population has experienced back pain. This problem is second only to colds as the reason people stay home from work. It’s also high on the list of reasons for going to the doctor, the storefront medical clinic or the emergency room. Annual spending on back pain relief is estimated to be in the area of 50 billion dollars.

What’s Causing My Back Pain? Muscle Strain or a Disc Problem?

Two of the most common causes of back pain are strains and sprains, and spinal disc problems. Let’s take a few moments to define each condition:

Muscle strains and sprains

Muscle Strain - Muscle strain is an injury to the muscle tissue or the tendons that attach muscle to bone. The muscle or its tough connective tissue can be overstretched, twisted or torn. This kind of injury can be caused by overexertion. Sometimes strains result from playing sports, lifting, bending or twisting by people who are not in peak physical condition

Sprain - Sprains affect the ligaments, the bands of fibrous tissue that connect and cushion the places where two bones meet. Sprain injuries can often result from a sudden impact: a fall, a tackle or impact with another player in sports, or an auto accident.

Disc Problems

Herniated Disc - Also known as slipped disc or ruptured disc, this is a displacement or bulge in one of the meniscus discs, the shock absorbing cartilage tissue that separates the bones of the back (known medically as the vertebrae). More common in the lumbar region, or lower back, a herniated disc is the result of long term wear and tear. The tough outer layer of the meniscus protects a more gel-like inner section called the nucleus pulposus. Herniation or rupture results from a tear or split in the outer layer, allowing some of the nucleus pulposus to push out of the disc. The vertebral bones can shift on the misshapen disc. If the bones press against the sciatic nerve, a part of the spinal cord that travels down the leg, the result can be sciatica, an extremely painful condition that can be accompanied by tingling, numbness and weakened muscle control. A sneeze or cough can jolt the affected area of the back, setting off spasms of pain. Conservative treatment of herniated disc can include rest, anti-inflammatory medicine, elevated legs and cold or warm compresses. If the condition persists, there’s a risk that decreased muscle tone from inactivity could make the condition more likely in future. If that seems to be your situation, your doctor might recommend an epidural injection of cortisone in the affected area of the back, to reduce inflammation and swelling. In persistent chronic cases, especially when neurological deterioration is progressive, surgery could be the best option.

Healthy Back Tips

These are the best ways to avoid lower back injury, but we hear them so often, it could almost be mom telling us what to do:

Lift carefully - You’ve heard it before: “lift with your legs.” One way to avoid hurting your back while lifting something is to avoid bending over. Flex our knees and squat, or better yet, get someone to help you, to spread the load.

Stand up straight - Keep your shoulders back, your chin up, and your chest out when standing or walking; sit up with both feet on the floor, and sleep on your side on a firm mattress, just as mom always said.

Choose Your Shoes Carefully - High heels, cowboy boots and flip-flops can be risky because they can set off a kinetic chain of stress that starts in the feet and has painful consequences in the lower back. If you’re getting started with walking, jogging or running for exercise, spend the time and money necessary to research and buy appropriate footwear.

Stretch Before and After Exercise - Warming up and cooling down your muscles is vital to injury-free activity, more and more as you progress from adolescence through adulthood to old age.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


Anterior Cervical Discectomy with Fusion (ACDF)

February 26th, 2019
(ACDF) Anterior Cervical Discectomy with Fusion

What is an Anterior Cervical Discectomy with Fusion (ACDF)?

Your healthcare professional may recommend an ACDF if you are suffering from disc herniation or degeneration in the upper part of the spine known as the cervical area. The Anterior Cervical Discectomy is a procedure that involves surgically entering the front (Anterior) of the neck (Cervical) and removing a damaged cervical disc (Discectomy). Implants of bone and/or metal are put in place of the damaged disc and act to fuse the two vertebra together.

Who needs this procedure?

If you have some of the following conditions or symptoms, you may be a candidate for an ACDF:

  • Weakness in your hand or arm.
  • Arm pain that is more severe than neck pain
  • Numbness/weakness in arms and extremities
  • Degenerative discs or herniated discs
  • Other cervical symptoms that have failed to respond to medication or physical therapy

Your healthcare provider can review the exact symptoms and causes that apply to you and why you may be a candidate for the Anterior Cervical Discectomy with Fusion.

The anterior cervical discectomy with fusion procedure

Incision

Anterior Cervical Discectomy Step 1 Incision

An incision is made across the front of the neck to gain access to the cervical spine.

Disc Removal

Anterior Cervical Discectomy Step 2 Disc Removal

The damaged disc is removed, relieving pressure from the previously pinched nerve roots. Space is made above and below the removed disc, making room for the bone graft.

Bone Graft Insertion

Anterior Cervical Discectomy Step 3 Bone Graft Insertion

The bone graft is inserted between the vertebra, in the space made for it in the previous step.

Metal Plate Attachment

Anterior Cervical Discectomy Step 4 Metal Plate Attachment

A metal plate may be attached to the area to hold the bones in place during the healing process.

Closure

Anterior Cervical Discectomy Step 5 Closure

The bone graft binds with the vertebra, growing together to help stabilize the spine.

After Surgery and Recovery

Recovery time is specific for each patient, but your surgeon will have a recovery plan to get you back to normal after the operation. Typically, patients are walking around by the end of the day, and able to return to work in 3-6 weeks, depending on how healed they are and the level of activity involved.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


Neck and Back Pain Overview

February 21st, 2019
Back and Neck Pain Overview

What are Back and Neck Pain?

We don't usually think about our necks or backs, so when pain or irritation begins, it can seem overwhelming. That pain can last for hours, days, or years, depending on the cause.

This article refers to acute and chronic pain. Acute pain is sudden, sharp, and related to tissue damage. Acute pain can subside instantly or last three to six months. If acute pain isn't relieved, it can lead to chronic pain. Chronic pain continues even after an injury has healed and lasts more than three to six months. The source of chronic pain can be something identifiable, like an ongoing injury, or something unidentifiable, like when no injury is present. Chronic pain is described as an aching, deep, burning or dull feeling that carries into the extremities.

What causes Back and Neck Pain Overview?

Most pain in the back and neck is caused by issues with muscles. This is often more mild pain, caused by muscle tension, cramps, or sprains. Poor posture can cause back and neck pain by forcing the spine into an incorrect position. This position causes weight to be distributed incorrectly. Pain can also be caused by wear-and-tear from aging or overuse through conditions like arthritis. This can cause degeneration that leads to nerve compression. Traumatic injury can also causes neck pain. This can be through a sudden impact or blow and can cause conditions like herniated disc.

What are the Vertebral Discs?

Your spine is made of different sections of vertebral discs. The cervical section of the spine is in your neck, the thoracic section is in your upper back, and the lumbar section is in your lower back. Vertebral discs separate the vertebrae in your spine, acting as shock absorbers for the spinal column by providing a cushion between the vertebrae. These discs are made of tough, elastic material that allows the spine to bend and twist naturally. The tough outer wall of the disc is called the annulus fibrosis, while the soft material contained inside the disc wall is called the nucleus pulposis.

Vertebral Disc Wall Weakness

Despite their strength and elasticity, vertebral discs can be damaged by injury or everyday wear-and-tear from aging. Often, this damage starts with cracking and weakening of fibers in the disc's annulus fibrosis. Radial tears can form in the disc wall, in or near sensitive nerve fibers.

Nucleus Pushing Through The Vertebral Disc Wall

As the outer wall weakens, the nucleus pulposis will push through the wall's tear to the edge of the disc wall. This additional pressure creates back pain at the level of the affected disc.

Pressure Against Nerve Roots

If the nucleus pulposis pushes through and out of the disc wall's outer edge, it's called a herniation or a rupture. This herniated disc material may put pressure against the nerve roots near the disc, which can cause radiating pain to travel down one or both of the legs.

How are Back and Neck Pain Overview treated?

Treatment of any back or neck pain will vary depending on the severity and location of the condition. Your doctor may recommend conservative treatment methods like physical therapy, injections, rest, activity modification, medication, or others. In some cases, surgery may be necessary.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


Chicken With Lemon & Dill

February 16th, 2019
Chicken with Lemon and Dill

This light, flavorful dish would go great with a green salad, oven roasted potatoes, or Basmati rice as a side dish.

Chicken with Lemon & Dill

Prep Time: 30 Minutes
Total Time: 30 Minutes
Makes: 4 Servings

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (1-1 1/4 pounds)
Salt & freshly ground pepper to taste
3 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil or canola oil, divided
1/4 cup onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
2 teaspoons flour
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill, divided
1 tablespoon lemon juice (about half a lemon’s worth, if you choose to go with fresh)

The longer days, warm temperatures and plentiful outdoor activities of summertime seem to call out for light, flavorful dishes that won't hold you hostage in the kitchen while the sun shines. Here’s a perfect candidate that would go great with a green salad, oven roasted potatoes, or Basmati rice as a side dish. It’s quick and easy to prepare and offers plenty of nutrition, but it’s still light and simple, so it won’t slow you down.

Directions:

  1. Season the chicken with salt and pepper on both sides. Over medium-high temperature, heat 1 & 1/2 teaspoons of the oil in a large, heavy skillet. Add the chicken. Sear on both sides, until well browned, about 3 minutes each side. Transfer the chicken to a plate and keep warm.
  2. Reduce the heat to medium and add the remaining 1 & 1/2 teaspoons of oil to the pan. Add the garlic and onion and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly. In a measuring pitcher, whisk the flour, broth, 1 tablespoon dill and the lemon juice, and add to pan. Cook, and continue to whisk the mixture about 3 minutes until the sauce thickens slightly.
  3. Return the chicken to the pan along with any juices and reduce heat to low. Simmer until the chicken is thoroughly cooked, about 4 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a warm platter. Use salt and pepper to season the sauce to taste and spoon over the chicken. Garnish with the remaining tablespoon of chopped fresh dill.
  4. Serve and enjoy!

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


15 Ways to Improve Your Cardio Workout

February 11th, 2019

Knowing how to improve your cardio workout isn’t always that easy. Unfortunately, there’s just not that much practical and useful online information. While much attention is drawn to weightlifting routines and exercises, cardio often gets put on the backburner. The idea that cardio isn’t as fun or beneficial as lifting weights simply isn’t true. This post has fifteen ways to improve your cardio workout so it can become fun, effective, and consistent.

1 - Explore your options

Getting on a treadmill and boringly pounding away for ten, twenty, or thirty minutes isn’t your only cardio option. With modern gyms and fitness classes, the cardio workout options are endless. Some of the more popular ones include:

  • Spinning
  • Body pump
  • Dancing
  • Swimming
  • Water aerobics

Of course, traditional cardio workouts like outdoor running and cycling are always options as well.

2 - Use the buddy system

Finding a cardio workout buddy can be a great addition to your workout. You can think of ways to alter your workouts and you can push each other. Most people find that their cardio workouts become more fun and effective when they work out with a buddy.

3 - Workout at the right time

Choosing a workout time that fits your schedule and routine will help you enjoy workouts and stay motivated. If you really want to get the most out of your workout, there’s no reason to schedule it at a time when you want to be doing something else.

4 - Use the right equipment

Using the wrong type of equipment can make cardio miserable and cause you to underperform or quit. Take shoes for example. A pair of running shoes that don't fit your feet will undoubtedly make you hate running. Take the time to research equipment and talk to experts about it.

5 - Use the outdoors

If you like nature and the weather is great, go outside for your workout. Beautiful surroundings and fresh air can be great motivators.

6 - Use bodyweight exercises

Body weight exercises like squats, push ups, sit ups, and pull-ups are great ways to train your muscles and break up a cardio workout if it gets boring.

7 - Warm-up

A proper warm-up is a super important part of a workout that's often times neglected. A five to ten-minute warm-up session that includes dynamic stretching helps get your body acclimated to the work it’s about to do.

8 - Use a heart rate monitor

Heart rate monitors are great because they allow you to track what’s going on during your workout. Too often, people aimlessly go through a cardio workout without knowing how hard they’re working.

9 - Interval training

Interval training consists of bursts of high energy cardio training followed by rest periods of low energy cardio training. Interval training can be short or long depending on what you're trying to accomplish. The benefits of interval training are that it makes workouts less monotonous and it greatly improves cardiovascular fitness.

10 - Low-intensity aerobic training

Low-intensity aerobic training consists of a light workout for twenty minutes or longer. The benefits of this type of training are that it can help improve endurance and it can be used during days when you don't feel like working out very hard.

11 - Anaerobic threshold training

Anaerobic threshold training is working out at the level just before your body switches from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. The best way to determine your anaerobic threshold is to find a pace where you can say a short sentence without becoming out of breath or feeling like you can say more.

12 - Cool-down

A brief cool down period is just as important as a warm-up. During a cool down period, your body begins to relax and recover.

13 - Monitor your heart rate drop

Your heart rate drop is the time it takes your heart to return to its resting rate after exercise. Heart rate drop is a great indicator of cardiovascular fitness and as such can be used to monitor your progress.

14 - Keep a log

Keeping track of your workouts will help you monitor your progress and plan future workouts. It will also help you stay motivated.

15 - Have fun

The best workouts are those that are fun. You should always keep that in mind before, during, and after your workout.

Conclusion

The information in this post can be used to help improve your cardio workout. Use any or any combination of the fifteen ideas as you see necessary. Remember to always keep in mind that your workout should be fun. If you need any help or would like to speak to one of our experts, please feel free to contact us.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.


How To Destroy Your Spine – Part 2

February 6th, 2019

Bad Posture

In "How to Destroy Your Spine Part 1," you learned that lifting things incorrectly can wreck your back. But did you know you can destroy your spine even if you're just standing or sitting down? Even if it doesn't seem like you're doing anything physically taxing, poor posture may be ruining your back. Here's how:

Bad Posture:

When standing, do you tilt your head in any direction, lock your knees, or put your weight on one foot? Do you slump your shoulders forward or keep them pulled so far back that your abdomen is pushed forward? When you sit, especially for long periods of time, do you find yourself leaning slouching or slumping? Do you put all your weight on one hip or lean toward your work? If you answered yes to any of these, your posture may be hurting you.

A healthy spine makes a slight S-shape. There should be a curve inward at your lower back, a slight curve outward at your upper back, and then another gentle curve inward at the top of your spine. A healthy spine has these curves, and good posture helps you retain them. Bad posture can increase the angles of the curves, putting your joints and bones in the wrong alignment and causing your body to work harder. This can cause fatigue, muscle strain, headaches, and back pain, but it can also put you at an increased risk of injury.

Good standing posture boils down to holding your chest high, keeping your shoulders relaxed but back, pulling in your abdomen and buttocks, and balancing your weight evenly on both of your feet. Your feet should be kept parallel.

When sitting, it's best to keep your back slightly arched and your head and shoulders straight. Keep your buttocks and back against the back of the chair, and your feet flat on the ground. You should make any necessary adjustments to your workspace to ensure you're sitting at a good height, preferably one where your hips are at the same level as your knees. It's also good to stand and stretch by putting your hands on your lower back and arching slightly backwards at least every hour to give your back a break.

An easy way to determine your best posture is to stand up straight against a wall, touching your buttocks, shoulder blades, and the back of your head to the wall. Keeping your heels two to four inches away from the wall, place your hand behind your lower back's curve with your palm flat against the wall. There should be approximately enough space for the thickness of your hand. Tighten the muscles in your abdomen if there's too much space and arch your back more if there's too little space. Once this is accomplished, you've found the correct posture for your body and should try to maintain it.


All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2019 VoxMD.com, All Rights Reserved.